Culture

Immersive study of Shaolin Kung Fu in the culture and country of origin contribute to the unique experiences students have training at the school in Qufu. To support this, the school offers various free optional cultural classes in the evening for students to benefit from deepening their knowledge and understanding of Traditional Chinese Culture. These enable students to gain insight into the philosophies, culture and language underlying their interrelated study of Chinese and Shaolin Martial Arts. The classes are popular with students as they are able to combine their learning and stay with gaining skills such as Chinese Mandarin or the main principles of acupuncture massage.

The main relgious beliefs in China: Buddhism  Taoism   Confucianism. 

As a Shaolin school, we list Buddhism as the first optional class for students. As it is the theory that ShaolinKung Fu is based on. Here are some basic questions on this topic
 

Q: What is Buddhism?

A: Buddhism is a religion to about 300 million people around the world. The word comes from 'budhi', 'to awaken'. It has its origins about 2,500 years ago when Siddhartha Gotama, known as the Buddha, was himself awakened (enlightened) at the age of 35.
 

Q: Is Buddhism a Religion?

A: To many, Buddhism goes beyond religion and is more of a philosophy or 'way of life'. It is a philosophy because philosophy 'means love of wisdom' and the Buddhist path can be summed up as:
(1) to lead a moral life,
(2) to be mindful and aware of thoughts and actions, and
(3) to develop wisdom and understanding.
 

Q: How Can Buddhism Help Me?

A: Buddhism explains a purpose to life, it explains apparent injustice and inequality around the world, and it provides a code of practice or way of life that leads to true happiness.
 

Q: Why is Buddhism Becoming Popular?

A: Buddhism is becoming popular in western countries for a number of reasons, The first good reason is Buddhism has answers to many of the problems in modern materialistic societies. It also includes (for those who are interested) a deep understanding of the human mind (and natural therapies) which prominent psychologists around the world are now discovering to be both very advanced and effective.
 

Q: Who Was the Buddha?

A: Siddhartha Gotama was born into a royal family in Lumbini, now located in Nepal, in 563 BC. At 29, he realised that wealth and luxury did not guarantee happiness, so he explored the different teachings religions and philosophies of the day, to find the key to human happiness. After six years of study and meditation he finally found 'the middle path' and was enlightened. After enlightenment, the Buddha spent the rest of his life teaching the principles of Buddhism — called the Dhamma, or Truth — until his death at the age of 80.


Taoism is the native belief of China, which is the origin of Chinese moral standard are bulit on.

Taoism (pronounced and also spelled Daoism; Chinese: 道教 or 道家; pinyin: dàojiào or dàojiā) is a philosophy and religious tradition that emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (Chinese: 道; pinyin: dào). The term Tao (or Dao, depending on the romanization system used) originally means "way", "path" or "principle", and can be found in many Chinese philosophies and religions. In Taoism, however, it denotes an obscure metaphysical force which is ultimately ineffable: "The Tao that can be named is not the absolute Tao."[1] According to Taoist, the Tao is the source and essence of everything that exists.


The keystone work of literature in Taoism is the Daodejing, a concise and ambiguous book containing teachings attributed to Laozi, or "the Old Teacher". Together with the writings of Zhuangzi, these texts build the philosophical foundation of Taoism. This philosophical Taoism, individualistic by nature, is not institutionalized. Institutionalized forms, however, evolved over time in the shape of a number of different schools, often integrating beliefs and practices that even pre-dated the keystone texts – as, for example, the theories of yin-yang and the Five Phases. Taoist schools traditionally feature reverence for Laozi, immortals or ancestors, along with a variety of divination and exorcism rituals, and practices for achieving ecstasy, longevity or immortality.


Taoist propriety and ethics may vary depending on the particular school, but in general tends to emphasize wu wei (action through non-action), simplicity, spontaneity, harmony between the individual and the cosmos (天人相应), and the Three Treasures: Compassion, Moderation, and Humility.


Taoism has had profound influence on Chinese culture in course of the centuries, and clerics of institutionalised Taoism (Chinese: 道士; pinyin: dàoshi) usually take care to note distinction between their ritual tradition and the customs and practices found in Chinese folk religion as these distinctions sometimes appear blurred. Chinese alchemy (especially neidan), Chinese astrology, Zen Buddhism, several martial arts, Traditional Chinese medicine, feng shui, and many styles of qigong have been intertwined with Taoism throughout history. Beyond China, Taoism also had influence on surrounding societies in Asia.


After Laozi and Zhuangzi the literature of Taoism grew steadily and used to be compiled in form of a canon – the Daozang, which was at times published at the behest of the emperor. Throughout Chinese history, Taoism was several times nominated as state religion. After the 17th century, however, it fell much from favor. Like all other religious activity, Taoism was suppressed in the first decades of the People's Republic of China (and even persecuted during the Cultural Revolution), but continued to be practised in Taiwan. Today, it is one of five religions recognized in the PRC, and although it does not travel readily from its Asian roots, claims adherents in a number of societies.[2]


Conficianism is the most important ruling phylosophy that the Chinese Emporos apply. It palyes a very important rule in Chinese trafitional Culture.


Confucianism is a Chinese ethical and philosophical system developed from the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (Kǒng Fūzǐ, or K'ung-fu-tzu, lit. "Master Kong", 551–478 BC). Confucianism originated as an "ethical-sociopolitical teaching" during the Spring and Autumn Period, but later developed metaphysical and cosmological elements in the Han Dynasty.[1] Following the abandonment of Legalism in China after the Qin Dynasty, Confucianism became the official state ideology of China, until it was replaced by the "Three Principles of the People" ideology with the establishment of the Republic of China, and then Maoist Communism after the ROC was replaced by the People's Republic of China in Mainland China.


The core of Confucianism is humanism,[2] the belief that human beings are teachable, improvable and perfectible through personal and communal endeavour especially including self-cultivation and self-creation. Confucianism focuses on the cultivation of virtue and maintenance of ethics, the most basic of which are ren, yi, and li.[3] Ren is an obligation of altruism and humaneness for other individuals within a community, yi is the upholding of righteousness and the moral disposition to do good, and li is a system of norms and propriety that determines how a person should properly act within a community.[3] Confucianism holds that one should give up one's life, if necessary, either passively or actively, for the sake of upholding the cardinal moral values of ren and yi.[4] Although Confucius the man may have been a believer in Chinese folk religion, Confucianism as an ideology is humanistic[2] and non-theistic, and does not involve a belief in the supernatural or in a personal god.[5]


Cultures and countries strongly influenced by Confucianism include mainland China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan and Vietnam, as well as various territories settled predominantly by Chinese people, such as Singapore. Although Confucian ideas prevail in these areas, few people outside of academia identify themselves as Confucian,[6][7] and instead see Confucian ethics as a complementary guideline for other ideologies and beliefs, including democracy,[8] Marxism,[9] capitalism,[10] Christianity,[11] Islam[12] and Buddhism.[13]


Chinese Mandarin
We are offering Chinese Mandarin class three times a week. It is also possiblefor you to have a schedule with more time on this.

Calligraphy
Chinese calligraphy is a form of calligraphy widely practiced and revered in the Sinosphere, which often includes China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. The East Asian calligraphic tradition originated and developed from China. There is a general standardization of the various styles of calligraphy in this tradition. Chinese calligraphy and ink and wash painting are closely related, since they are accomplished using similar tools and techniques. Chinese painting and calligraphy distinguish themselves from other cultural arts because they emphasize motion and are charged with dynamic life. According to Stanley-Baker, "Calligraphy is sheer life experienced through energy in motion that is registered as traces on silk or paper, with time and rhythm in shifting space its main ingredients."[1] Calligraphy has also led to the development of many forms of art in East Asia, including seal carving, ornate paperweights, and inkstones.


Traditional Chinese Medicine (massage and acupuncture in particular)

Training
Experiences of the students

Read about the experiences of over 70 students from 20 different countries
Training
Training
Small group training
1 week - 5 years courses available
Shaolin Band Certificate
Accommodation
New school campus
Free Internet Connection
Single & air-conditioned room available
Life at the School
Free cultural and Mandarin lessons
Natural Mineral Springs
Leisure facilities
School Fees
All in one cost
Excellent value
Financial guarantee
Photos
certificatons & Competetions
National Martial Arts Bands
Master-Disple relationships Students competotions
Location
Location
The Shimen Mountain range
Birthplace of Confucius
The land of the fruit fields
Travel and Visa
Accessible by high speed bullet trains
Information on 6 month students' visas
FAQ's
Frequently Asked Questions
Answers to commonly asked questions
links